Culver City Observer -

By Letters 

Supports Increasing Density in Culver City

 


Dear Editor,

Those of us who oppose racism, must also support more housing in Culver City.

Did you know that housing inequality is one of the major reasons there is a large wealth gap between Black or Hispanic households and white households in the U.S? And did you know a typical white family has ten times the wealth of a typical Black or Hispanic family? In other words, on average, for every one hundred dollars a white household has, a Black or Hispanic household will have ten dollars. And, here's the important point for this discussion, most of this wealth (or lack of wealth) is concentrated in housing (or the lack of housing).

Of course, all this is built on four centuries of white supremacy – the near extermination of this country's native people, the most viscous slave system the world has every known, and the continuation of institutional and systematic racism ever since. Housing is one of the starkest expressions of all this today. The gap between Black and white family homeownership is larger than it was when it was legal to refuse to sell a home due to the color of a buyer's skin. The current housing crisis, and it is a crisis, has hit nonwhite communities much harder than white families. It is a nationwide crisis that is especially concentrated in California, and right here in Culver City.

There are many reasons we desperately need much more housing in our city, but one of the most critical is to help overcome our racist legacy as a sundown town. Founded for whites only, this city did everything in its power for decades to prevent nonwhite families from owning or renting homes or even from driving through town, especially after sunset. Providing more housing, of all kinds and in every neighborhood, with much of it affordable to the average person or family, is a crucial way for us to provide one form of reparations for all the harm our city has inflicted on its nonwhite neighbors, visitors and citizens. How can we be a welcoming city if we can't even provide housing for many of the people who work here? Where will our children's teachers live, where will the firefighters we rely on live, where will the restaurant and studio and tech employees live, if we don't create much more housing, much of it affordable?

If you oppose racism, you must support more housing density.

John Kent

Culver City

Editors Note:

Racism and housing density have nothing to do with each other.

 

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